Mr Porter’s shoppable collection for Kingsman, the film


Posted on 16th January, by Colin Chapman in menswear. No Comments


Bang in the middle of LC:M, Mr Porter held an event on Savile Row, featuring the collection that the luxury online retailer has produced for the film Kingsman, starring Colin Firth. The film had its world premiere on Wednesday night, with the cast, Take That and um, me in attendance. What was remarkable about the Mr Porter tie-in was how integral clothing and thus the collection (designed by Hollywood costume designer Ariane Phillips, who worked with Tom Ford on A Single Man) was to the film. In fact, the Kingsman spy HQ (actually a make over of the Huntsman store at 11 Savile Row, and used as the venue for Sunday night’s presentation of the collection) is at the very core of the story.

In the film, a suit, and in particular a bespoke Savile Row suit, is declared to be “a modern gentleman’s armour”. So far, so standard sartorial values. But while the suiting was beautiful, especially the navy pinstripe one worn by Taron Egerton in the film, transforming him from a trackie-wearing rough diamond (albeit an under-the-radar Jeremy Scott tracksuit wearer) into a suave gentleman, suiting wasn’t the only fashion success story in the film. As ever, my interest was focused on the quirkier elements. First up the glasses, worn by Firth, Egerton and iconic specs-wearer Michael Caine caught my attention. It turns out that the design, called, inevitably, Kingsman, are by by Cutler and Gross, designed through consultation between the film’s director Matthew Vaughan, and Cutler and Gross’s design director, Marie Wilkinson. The strong aviator shape is seen being worn by Colin Firth in tortoiseshell and in black by Taron Egerton. While Colin Firth requires no props to evoke elegance, the transformation in Taron Egerton is quite remarkable, though his buff physique might be more tricky to achieve.

Secondly, with Lou Dalton’s AW15 collection still on my mind, the tailored boiler suits the spy candidates wear during their competitive training sequence really caught my eye and I’m delighted to see that one such example is available to buy (though it was the large checked version I was smitten by). It turns out the correct term for this item is a siren suit, their original purpose being to provide a layer of warmth as you headed into the air raid shelter as the siren sounded. Apparently, Winston Churchill wore a pintstripe version so the style does have some heritage, a fact that would be an ideal riposte to the haters no doubt currently trolling LC:M image galleries everywhere. To end on a high note however, the Kingsman collection presents a very interesting proposition, bringing fashion and film into tangible proximity. The correspondence between the two in film history is already endless, and the idea of making film costume tangible in terms of fashion merchandising brings up all sorts of exciting possibilities, not least my personal dream team partnership of Prada and Wes Anderson.

Double-breasted pinstripe suit from the Kingsman collection

Double-breasted pinstripe suit from the Kingsman collection

Kingman by Cutler and Gross in tortoiseshell

Kingsman by Cutler and Gross in tortoiseshell

Chalk-stripe siren suit

Chalk-stripe siren suit

Colin Firth at the premiere

Colin Firth at the premiere

Taron Egerton at the premiere (sadly not wearing the glasses)

Taron Egerton at the premiere (sadly not wearing the glasses)

A red-carpet view of that checked 'siren suit'

A red-carpet view of that checked ‘siren suit’

Shop the full collection here

Kingsman opens at cinemas in the UK from next weekend

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