Westminster Fashion BA, 11 highlights from the graduate collections


Posted on 22nd May, by Colin Chapman in menswear. No Comments


On Wednesday evening Westminster University’s BA Fashion students showed their graduate collections. The course is led by Andrew Groves who himself is part of the living fabric of London’s fashion story and the sterling presence on the front row (Cozette McCreery from Sibling, Princess Julia, Hilary Alexander, Charlie Porter among many others) the seriousness with which this course is taken by the industry. But the evening belonged to the young designers who impressed with accomplished collections demonstrating unique starting points and some fascinating shared zeitgeists. I tried to squeeze it into a top 10 but there was too much to fit in. I look forward to a season of discovering new fashion talent in London.

All photos courtesy of Chris Moore.

1. Chloe McGeehan impressed with vibrant colours and sculptured draping which artfully avoided swamping the models.

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2. Craig Green was clearly an influence on Lucy James’s menswear but the work explored some interesting textures through painterly treatments and degraded fabrics.

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3. Roberta Einer’s work introduced an element of folksy detail, part Rajasthan part Hundertwasser with a good dose of Goldfrapp-enhanced glam rock thrown in for good measure.

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4. Georgia Mottershead’s work evoked vintage US mail bags and the form and functionality of American fit-for-purpose workwear

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5. Kate Brittain had the high-fashion knitwear expert to my right exclaiming the techniques on show, featuring crochet and leather in flamenco ruffles.

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6. Daniel McKinley’s work explored the tension between the roughness of workwear and vivid painted surfaces with some elegant outlines.

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7. Samuel Best’s menswear was also about contrasts here between loose flowing shapes and degraded, shredded fabrics.

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8. One of the more avant-garde offerings, Matt Witcombe’s work explored padding, scaled up proportions and the boundaries between surfaces.

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9. Robert Newman’s was one of the most accomplished menswear collections featuring a gorgeous colour palette, folky motifs, print and elaborate fastenings.

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10. Charlotte Scott’s menswear vision brought Cubist shapes and a Pop Art sensibility to life while playing games with flat planes, and perspective. Another very strong colour palette.

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11. Robyn Priestly shook things up and had the front row buzzing with her uncompromising blend of lace, boxing boots and flowing ecclesiastical robes, in all-white.

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